Winners 2017

overall-winner-small The Clink Charity

Reducing re-offending rates among prisoners through training

 

The Clink Charity was set up to reduce reoffending rates, which remain stubbornly and startlingly high. The most recent figures show that 44 of every hundred adults released from custody go on to reoffend within a year. The figure is higher for prisoners sentenced to less than a year.

The Clink Charity image
Reducing re-offending rates among prisoners through training

The charity provides a vocational scheme which prepares prisoners for a professional working environment though hands-on experience in its chain of restaurants, which offer fine dining to paying customers.

The scheme involves a five-step model of recruitment, training, support, employment and mentoring, which provides support before, during and after the six to 18-month programme. For many taking part, it is their first legal job.

The programme has produced results. A recent report conducted by the Justice Data Lab and the Ministry of Justice found that for every 100 prisoners participating in the programme, 17 would re-offend within the year, as opposed to the average for similar prisoners of 29. This marks a 41 per cent reduction in the re-offending rate.

In 2016, the charity delivered 215,000 training hours, educating 400 prisoners and serving 98,000 dishes across the Clink restaurants. The programme is supported by more than 300 employers and aims to produce 1,000 graduates per year through 20 courses around the country by 2020.

But its aim is not just to train the prisoners. The Clink Charity aims to train the public too, in the idea that people leaving prison deserve support and help, and in many cases are eager for the opportunity to work.

Judges were impressed with many aspects of the Clink’s work. Its training was of high quality and helped prisoners to achieve a high level of skill. The charity had an beneficiary-focused attitude and a very clear understanding of the needs of the people it helped.

But despite always putting the beneficiary front and centre, the benefits extended far beyond the individuals it helped. Its work was extremely cost effective, and had a proven result in reducing expenditure to the public purse. Its interaction with the public was not just helping individuals but changing perceptions much more broadly.

The charity also impressed with the breadth of its connections, which stretched into the public, private and voluntary sectors, with partners ranging from celebrity chefs to the probation service to Shelter and Centrepoint.

Its work was also extremely sustainable – funded largely by receipts from paying customers who attended its restaurants – and the charity was keen to expand its operation both throughout the prison estate and into other areas of society. The work was also extremely replicable into other areas of society, and judges were again impressed by the way the charity was pursuing a strategy of growth.

 

theclinkcharity.org

CC reg no: 1134581

outstanding-achievementLynne Berry

‘The idea is to change the world’

 

 

Lynne Berry has spent a lifetime as a leader in the charity sector, not just as a chief executive but as a campaigner and trustee. David Ainsworth met her.

Lynne Berry OBE
Lynne Berry OBE, winner of the 2017 Daniel Phelan Award for Outstanding Achievement

Lynne Berry has held top jobs at quite a few of the sector’s most recognised organisations. Most notably, she led the Charity Commission and Women’s Royal Voluntary Service.

But Berry’s most exceptional contribution to the sector is perhaps outside the workplace, in her formidable non-executive CV. She is the chair of the newly-formed Breast Cancer Now, vicechair of the Canal and River Trust, chair of the Commission of the Voluntary Sector and Ageing, a fellow at Lucy Cavendish College in Cambridge, an honorary fellow at Cardiff University, a professor at Cass Business School in London, and trustee of four other charities.

Berry describes herself as “still a community worker at heart” and says she has tried to contribute not just through her day job, but “as a volunteer, an activist, a campaigner and of course as a trustee”. She believes that movements and communities, not big organisations, are the real heart of the sector.

Charities, she says, must be inclusive and must speak out for the voiceless. They must do more to demonstrate and prove that they are effective, and that they continue to deserve the public trust. Berry has always been involved in the sector, since fundraising as a child. “The themes have stayed the same,” she says. “Social justice, inequality, and people who don’t have a voice.”

She qualified as a social worker, and worked in Wandsworth, then became a community worker in Camden. After work in academia and the civil service, her first chief executive job was at the Family Welfare Association, now known as Family Action.

“I discovered a cash crisis and a leadership vacuum,” she says. “My time there was spent trying to find a focus for an organisation which had lost its way, but also lost its money. “The approach quickly changed. I thought any sector which could change so rapidly had real energy and commitment.”

Berry became involved in NCVO as a trustee, and worked on the Deakin Report, which drove thinking about the sector for many years.

“For me, the thing that I found really attractive was the idea that our voices together were much bigger than any one organisation,” she says. “We had a powerful voice and we could speak together. We could challenge others and move the centre of power.”

From there she moved to the Charity Commission, where she says she tried to shift the focus from a technical assessment of charity law to the broader one of public trust and confidence.

Berry worries about the Commission today. “It’s very underfunded,” she says. “People expect it to have the resources of a big economic regulator. It has the burden of phenomenal expectations, but less than phenomenal funding. “It’s a difficult sector to regulate. Everybody wants the Commission to come down hard and prevent wrongdoing, but this is a very independent sector. It needs space to operate.”

‘The idea is to change the world’

Since leaving the regulator, Berry has spent much of the rest of her time in campaigning roles, both inside and outside the sector, and she is keen for the sector to continue to advocate. “I feel very optimistic about social activism,” she says. “Technology means our voices can be stronger.

“The idea isn’t to interpret the world. The idea is to change it. Before Shelter brought homelessness to people’s attention, for example, no one thought it was a big issue. Charities have a role in identifying social problems and putting them on the agenda.” As leader of the Equal Opportunities Commission she campaigned for the rights of women to equal pay.

“What I learned was that you have to focus on the people who can make the difference,” she says. “In that case, it was business owners. Unless we could find leaders among employers, it wasn’t going to make a difference.”

In her next job at the General Social Care Council, she fought to have social care workers have the same recognition as healthcare workers – a battle which is still going on, a decade later.

And in her final full-time role as chief executive of WRVS, she spent her time seeking recognition for older people.

“I got really cross with the ageism which says that older people don’t make a social or an economic contribution,” she says. “Older people just weren’t getting taken seriously for the fundamental contribution they made.”

The voluntary sector, she says, is as ageist as anyone else.

“One of the most important things I’ve done is the Commission on the Voluntary Sector and Ageing,” she says. “At WRVS I heard a lot about ‘little old ladies’ but these were actually incredibly skilled people who were keeping the country and community functioning. The sector depends on the volunteering of the old.

“The sector is focused on getting more young volunteers. Well, what about old volunteers? Don’t assume the next generation is going to be as understanding at this one has been.” She also questions the focus on reducing the age of charity boards.

“What’s wrong with having a board of people in their 60s and 70s? They want to contribute. They have fundamental skill and expertise built up over a lifetime. And they have the time. It’s much more important to have diversity of views and backgrounds than of ages.”

Berry herself is emblematic of the volunteering generation. Since leaving WRVS, she has “gone portfolio”, with a bewildering array of trusteeships, memberships and academic posts.

One of her key themes is encouraging cross-sector collaboration.

“You can’t get things done by just prodding from the outside,” she says.

“You need to convince those with the real power that they need to make those changes happen. That’s what’s happened at the Canal and River Trust – this extraordinary transfer of public assets into the voluntary sector.

“It’s shown the strength of the sector. As a charity it can grow profile and engage volunteers. It’s far more effective now.”

Her highest profile role, though, is at Breast Cancer Now, formed by the recent merger of Breast Cancer Campaign and Breakthrough Breast Cancer. She is sure the merger will be judged a success.

“Some of the pink fog is already beginning to dissipate,” she says.

‘Some things work and some don’t’

One of Berry’s key messages to the sector is that it has to prove it is making a difference. Here she believes the focus of charity law is in the wrong place. While there are careful prescriptions for how charities must report the flow of money, there are few rules about how they must communicate their social impact – only boilerplate public benefit statements.

“It’s odd that there is nothing in law to require charities to demonstrate their impact,” she says.

Berry is involved in Pro Bono Economics, where some reporting standards are being developed to help charities assess whether their work is really effective.

“Some things work and some things don’t,” she says. “You need to know which is which. What is worth continuing your investment in?”

‘Don’t always look to the state’

So what has been the biggest change in charity since Berry began her career?

“A sense of confidence,” she says. “Charity believes in itself. And when I started, there wasn’t the same sense of a sector, just individual organisations.

“But I think the sector has too often looked to the state for the solution. Too often we’ve wanted to identify the problem and ask government to fix it. We should be trying to solve things ourselves. We can do things government can’t do. We can tap into people’s knowledge and expertise and skill. We should stop complaining and try to sort it out ourselves.

“Also, we’ve been so focused on the state we’ve neglected other parts of society. We have other hearts and minds to win.”

‘Could we be better?’

Berry is keen to make the sector stronger.

“Things are good in the world of charity,” she says. “Despite the recent issues with public trust, most people’s experience of charity is positive most of the time. The sector does some things incredibly well. But my question is, could we be better?”

Charities, she feels, aren’t engaging as well as they could with the public.

“It’s about movements, not organisations,” she says. “It’s about civil society, not charity.

“We need a society in which people can contribute, in which they feel empowered and engaged, in which they feel they have a voice. There are an awful lot of people who just feel ignored. If we’d succeeded in building a strong civil society, people in the UK wouldn’t feel so marginalised.

“I would like to see the sector do more about making sure that people have a voice. I would like charity to be less issue-based, and more about capacity-building.”

At root, however, she remains proud of her sector, and her career in it. “It makes me incredibly proud to win this award,” she says. “Because this is a sector I’ve put my heart and life and energy into, and I hope I’ve made a difference. I feel very proud that’s been recognised. And it sets me up to do even more.”

The Berry Years

  • 1976 – 1979: Social Worker, Wandsworth Borough Council
  • 1979 – 1981: Community Worker, Camden Council of Social Service
  • 1981 – 1984: Lecturer, Polytechnic of Central London
  • 1984 – 1988: Lecturer, National Institute of Social Work
  • 1988 – 1990: Social Services Inspector, Department of Health
  • 1990 – 1996: Chief Executive, Family Welfare Association
  • 1996 – 1999: Executive Director, Charity Commission
  • 1999 – 2001: Chief Executive, Equal Opportunities Commission
  • 2001 – 2007: Chief Executive, General Social Care Council
  • 2007 – 2011: Chief Executive, WRVS

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overall-winner-smallCreate

Delivering creative arts projects to empower disadvantaged people

 

The creative:connection project, which this charity won for, was born out of the idea that disability prejudice and access to the arts are directly correlated.

Create image
Delivering creative arts projects to empower disadvantaged people

Creative arts charity Create felt that both disabled and non-disabled people can equally benefit from disabled people having access to the arts – as it can boost self-esteem, confidence, visibility and acceptance.

Create brought young people with and without disabilities together in creative arts workshops led by professional artists. The programme gives disabled young people access to these art professionals without having to navigate inaccessible venues. Each workshop focuses on instigating friendships as well as developing self-esteem.

The judges felt the project was particularly strong because it cut across boundaries rather than operating in silos, and offered something for everyone involved.

Rather than focusing purely on delivery to service users, the charity was able to produce an intervention that rewarded all stakeholders – not just disabled people, but those who interacted with them.

The charity also impressed with the energy and engagement of the senior leadership. The charity used its networks and its personal connections to drive support and enthusiasm for its activities.

The charity was also able to evidence impact. It has reached 954 participants, with 97 per cent of those saying they had enjoyed the project, 91 per cent saying the programme had developed their creativity, and 89 per cent saying it had developed their teamwork.

 

createarts.org.uk

CC reg no: 1099733

overall-winner-smallNational Aids Trust

Successfully challenged an NHS decision on an effective HIV prevention pill

 

When the NHS announced that it would not consider funding a new prophylactic drug, PrEP, which prevents the transmission of HIV, the National Aids Trust decided to challenge the decision.

National Aids Trust image
Successfully challenged an NHS decision on an effective HIV prevention pill

The trust is a policy body which lobbies to reduce HIV and AIDS, and had been working with the NHS for 18 months, helping it to gather evidence to help it decide whether to commission the drug.

Following the decision not to consider the drug, the trust gathered together a campaign team in the HIV sector, sought legal advice, and eventually decided to take the NHS to judicial review. Simultaneously, the trust developed and shared a media campaign to counter negative coverage and kept the issue in the political eye.

The trust won the judicial review, and then went on to successfully defend the case in the Court of Appeal. Eventually the NHS agreed to a medical trial involving 10,000 people.

The awards judges felt the trust carried out a classic charitable campaign, and did so extremely well. The trust followed the steps necessary to deliver results. It engaged with the policy, set a clear goal, and pursued the result to the conclusion. The charity took a considerable risk, went through the correct governance processes to ensure that it was right to do so, and showed the necessary courage.

The campaign stood out for the impact that it achieved – potentially affecting, and saving, many lives, and challenging unfairness that would have harmed its beneficiaries.

Results are already clear. Sexual health clinics in London have seen steep declines in new HIV cases after a trial of the drug, and similar figures are expected countrywide.

 

www.nat.org.uk

CC reg no: 297977

overall-winner-small The Lullaby Trust

Helping young parents to prevent infant death

 

The Lullaby Trust, a charity which helps prevent cot death among infants, found that parents under the age of 20 were four times as likely to lose a child to sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. Infant mortality in general was 44 per cent higher for this group.

The Lullaby Trust image
Helping young parents to prevent infant death

Faced with the spectre of unnecessary death among babies, the charity decided to reach out to young parents to discover the barriers which prevent them from accessing advice. It found that young parents in London experience disapproving attitudes from professionals and a difficult environment, leading to isolation and depression. But they were also less likely to follow advice about care for their babies.

The charity completely changed its communications approach, and reached 70,000 people online, with a widespread change in whether advice was followed. It also provided reeducation programmes for health professionals, and established a youth advisory panel to ensure that young parent’s voices were heard.

This successful communications approach was one of the key points that attracted judges to the entry. It was able to evidence that it had done had likely saved babies’ lives.

Judges were impressed that the charity showed how digital tools could sit alongside more traditional charity approaches in delivering results. The charity had been able to harness the power of online communication to engage with many users, and had measured whether they were engaging.

Judges were also impressed by the user-first approach. The charity had listened to the key stakeholders – young parents – and identified what was needed to help them succeed for themselves, then implemented multiple approaches to ensure that happened, engaging not just with the parents themselves but with other key influencers – health professionals. It had also taken steps to ensure it continued to listen to all parties.

 

www.lullabytrust.org.uk

CC reg. no: 262191

overall-winner-smallAspire

Creating disabled role models in the fitness industry

 

There are 10 million disabled people in the UK and less than 8 per cent are estimated to be achieving the recommended levels of physical activity.

Aspire image
Creating disabled role models in the fitness industry

Aspire provides practical help to those who have been paralysed by spinal cord injuries. It wanted to create more disabled role models working in the fitness industry, and established InstructAbility, which provides free, accessible training to unemployed, disabled people.

As a result, 300 disabled people have qualified as fitness professionals and have contributed over 40,000 hours of voluntary service to provide over 60,000 sessions to support disabled clients. Over half have now been offered employment, and 80 per cent of the leisure centres which participated reported a positive impact.

Judges felt this was a model with scalability, and also potentially provided a blueprint that could help other charities, working in other sectors, to develop models for disabled people interested in returning to work. It also had the advantage that because it was carried out in partnership with leisure centres, there was potentially a long term sustainable source of funding to allow it to continue.

Another aspect of the Aspire model that appealed to judges was the fact that it had so many connected benefits, and simultaneously engaged multiple stakeholders in a beneficial way – one of the unique strengths of a charity model.

Not only did it provide tangible material benefits to disabled people who obtained a new skill and potentially were able to return to employment, but it also improved their physical fitness and self-esteem. It also encouraged fitness and integration among other disabled people, changed perceptions among able-bodied people, and raised accessibility in public places.

www.aspire.org.uk

Reg no: 1075317

overall-winner-small The Clink Charity

Reducing re-offending rates among prisoners through training

 

The Clink Charity was set up to reduce reoffending rates, which remain stubbornly and startlingly high. The most recent figures show that 44 of every hundred adults released from custody go on to reoffend within a year. The figure is higher for prisoners sentenced to less than a year.

The Clink Charity image
Reducing re-offending rates among prisoners through training

The charity provides a vocational scheme which prepares prisoners for a professional working environment though hands-on experience in its chain of restaurants, which offer fine dining to paying customers.

The scheme involves a five-step model of recruitment, training, support, employment and mentoring, which provides support before, during and after the six to 18-month programme. For many taking part, it is their first legal job.

The programme has produced results. A recent report conducted by the Justice Data Lab and the Ministry of Justice found that for every 100 prisoners participating in the programme, 17 would re-offend within the year, as opposed to the average for similar prisoners of 29. This marks a 41 per cent reduction in the re-offending rate.

In 2016, the charity delivered 215,000 training hours, educating 400 prisoners and serving 98,000 dishes across the Clink restaurants. The programme is supported by more than 300 employers and aims to produce 1,000 graduates per year through 20 courses around the country by 2020.

But its aim is not just to train the prisoners. The Clink Charity aims to train the public too, in the idea that people leaving prison deserve support and help, and in many cases are eager for the opportunity to work.

Judges were impressed with many aspects of the Clink’s work. Its training was of high quality and helped prisoners to achieve a high level of skill. The charity had an beneficiary-focused attitude and a very clear understanding of the needs of the people it helped.

But despite always putting the beneficiary front and centre, the benefits extended far beyond the individuals it helped. Its work was extremely cost effective, and had a proven result in reducing expenditure to the public purse. Its interaction with the public was not just helping individuals but changing perceptions much more broadly.

The charity also impressed with the breadth of its connections, which stretched into the public, private and voluntary sectors, with partners ranging from celebrity chefs to the probation service to Shelter and Centrepoint.

Its work was also extremely sustainable – funded largely by receipts from paying customers who attended its restaurants – and the charity was keen to expand its operation both throughout the prison estate and into other areas of society. The work was also extremely replicable into other areas of society, and judges were again impressed by the way the charity was pursuing a strategy of growth.

 

theclinkcharity.org

CC reg no: 1134581

overall-winner-smallFareShare UK

Making sure more food reaches people in need

 

FareShare was set up more than 20 years ago in response to a simple, glaring discrepancy: while people in the UK were going hungry, food producers and supermarkets in the UK were throwing perfectly good food away, for minor reasons such as misprinted labels, discolourations, or simply because there had been a bumper crop.

FareShare volunteer delivering food
FareShare volunteer delivering food

FareShare makes deals with producers to redistribute surplus food to community groups and charities across the UK, and that network is growing rapidly.

In 2016, it doubled the number of community groups it supports and provided a record 25.8 million meals, following a partnership with Tesco and the rollout of its FareShare FoodCloud app, which allows charities to learn when food is available.

The charity found the largest volume of food waste occurs high up the supply chain at manufacturing sites and retailer distribution centres so it focused on these areas.
The charity has set up a franchise model with local distribution partners. It now has 20 regional centres across the country that work with 5,589 local charities and community groups, and it is targeting further growth.

Judges were impressed with the charity’s ambitions for rapid growth, its partnerships across the private sector, and its use of multiple models to grow its influence and reduce waste. The charity showed continued innovation and adaptability to ensure that it was growing its impact.

Judges were also impressed with the development of new technology which allowed food to be shared more efficiently, and the fast-growing number of charities accessing its service. Judges also liked the cost-effectiveness of the model which relied on volunteers and small payments from charities, in order to make it effectively self-sustaining.

 

www.fareshare.org.uk

CC reg no: 1100051

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Brewin Dolphin

overall-winner-smallEast End Community Foundation

Tackling unemployment through multi-donor grants

 

In 2013 10.6 per cent of people in the East End of London were unemployed, compared with a city-wide average of 8.9 per cent and a nationwide average of 7.9 per cent. Young unemployment and long-term unemployment were particularly high.

Young people attending training at funded project Fight for Peace
Young people attending training at funded project Fight for Peace

The East End Community Foundation set about piloting an innovative model to bring together multiple donors over many years, to work together to address the problem. It began by focusing on a single iconic building: 20 Fenchurch Street, known as the Walkie-Talkie.

The vision was to establish a fund that combined donations from all parties, including those made as part of the CSR programmes of the building managers, tenants and contractors, and voluntary ones from visitors to the building’s Sky Garden. In 2015-16 it secured £110,500, way in excess of its target of £65,000, and distributed funding to five different projects.

The judges liked the project, despite its relatively small scale, because it displayed how grant-givers can act as convenors. The charity did not just use its money to obtain results, but persuaded others who were not acting charitably to come together, increasing the total resources available.

It showed how foundations can deliver more through proactive engagement. Grant-givers can use transparency and effective communication to enhance a relatively small amount of money, build philanthropic networks and intentions among an influential group, and persuade them to partner to deliver something.

The project was also praised for the cost-effectiveness of its delivery with beneficiaries. On average it costs the government between £3,800 and £6,600 per person to support someone into work. Projects funded through the programme supported 165 people directly into work at a cost of £1,400 per person.

 

eastendcf.org

CC reg no: 1147789

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overall-winner-smallProspect Hospice

Improving end of life support in care homes

 

Prospect Hospice and Swindon Clinical Commissioning Group were faced with the simple fact that too many people were dying in hospital in their area – people who did not wish or need to. These people were enduring unnecessary discomfort, hindering hospital staff, and wasting resources.

Improving end of life support in care homes

The charity and the CCG identified a need to help care home staff learn more about how to provide palliative care to the terminally ill.

Most care homes in Swindon are privately-owned, so the charity carefully held meetings and built relationships with managers in the local private sector. The charity clinical nurse specialist team was then able to begin working with care homes to jointly review residents and formulate care plans.

The charity also worked to build the skills and confidence of care homes’ own staff. Prospect Hospice began hosting six-weekly care home support groups as well as an annual care homes conference.

The programme was a success. The standard of palliative care has increased, and almost 1,700 care home residents have been supported.

Judges were attracted to Prospect Hospice in part because it was addressing an issue which was absolutely central to modern society – helping people who are dealing with prolonged end of life issues to end their existence with dignity. One described the service as “desperately needed”.

An additional benefit was that the work was taking place in a sector which is under-resourced and in need of support – the private healthcare sector.
Quite apart from the benefit to patients, the process also showed considerable financial benefits, by avoiding unnecessary hospital admission.

Judges were impressed by the in-depth cross-sector collaboration involving a charity, a healthcare body, and staff at private providers. Judges also once again identified a strong case for replicability across other providers.

 

www.prospect-hospice.net

CC reg no: 280093

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overall-winner-smallPump Aid

Restoring independence by treating people as customers, not beneficiaries

 

Pump Aid aims to fix problems with the traditional supply of water, via pumps, to some of the world’s poorest people. Its first project is in Kasungu, a province of Malawi, where water is in short supply. DfID estimates that at any given time 40 per cent of community water points in Malawi are not working, because people lack the skills to fix them.

Restoring independence by treating people as customers, not beneficiaries
Restoring independence by treating people as customers, not beneficiaries

Pump Aid aims to treat people as customers, not beneficiaries, and apply commercial principles: a self-supply approach.

Between 2014 and 2016 Pump Aid encouraged individuals in Kasungu to invest in their own water and sanitation. It trained 25 entrepreneurs, provided equipment and marketing material, and helped communities set up small businesses.

Judges felt the model’s single strongest point was that it put the beneficiary at the centre. Not only did it remove the need for costly outside intervention to supply water, it created business acumen and encouraged innovation and self-dependency among the local population. And it was based on what people themselves said they needed, rather than provision of what aid agencies felt they ought to have.

The model ticked many boxes: it was replicable, scalable and sustainable, and it would be easy to transfer it to other aid sectors, outside of water and sanitation.

So far, it has been a success. The programme led to the direct sale of water access products to households containing almost 2,500 people. An additional 7,160 individuals secured access to improved water, and the work of the entrepreneurs on broken community pumps renewed access for a further 11,954 individuals.

In total the pilot gave 21,614 individuals access to safe water at a cost per head that was less than half of that of a traditional community water point, and proved that even very poor people are willing to invest.

 

www.pumpaid.org

CC reg no: 1077889

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overall-winner-smallSmart Works

Helping unemployed women to successful interviews

 

Smart Works Charity image
Helping unemployed women to successful interviews

Smart Works exists to help unemployed women into work, by growing their interview skills, and providing them with professional clothes to boost their confidence.

Women are more likely to have breaks in their employment record due to caring responsibilities and many of Smart Works’ clients have applied for a significant number of jobs before coming to the charity. The charity works alongside the prison service, care service, homeless shelter and refuges to help their clients. It also works alongside a number of high profile fashion labels.

The project started in 2013 in London and has now been licensed the model to four other cities across the UK. It has helped 3,000 women to get back into work and become economically independent.

Newly-licensed Smart Works projects receive training and support to make sure the services is delivered to a high standard and consistently across the country.

Service delivery is carried out by skilled and trained volunteers who become ambassadors in their communities. There are now 250 volunteers across the country.

The project impressed the judges with its cross-sector partnership working, from the prison service to Burberry, and its use of volunteer to deliver advice.
Judges liked the fact that the project was addressing diversity and inequality issues, helping women from disadvantaged backgrounds. Judges also liked the simultaneous focus both on solving a specific problem – employment – and on wider confidence and self-esteem issues.

And judges were impressed by the charity’s ambition to grow across the country and ensure its services were available to all who needed them.
First and foremost, however, the results were impressive. Over half the charity’s clients found employment within a month.

 

smartworks.org.uk

CC reg no: 1080609

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