Winners 2012

overall-winner-small

The HALO Trust

Making villages landmine-free in Sri Lanka

2012-Overall-winnerAfter the end of the Sri Lanka civil war in 2009, landmine casualties rose significantly as people displaced during the conflict began to return home.

In response, the HALO Trust led a massive landmine clearance programme, which has seen over 100,000 landmines destroyed, allowing 190,000 people to return home safely.

HALO arrived at a plan to help tackle the mines problem in Sri Lanka by drawing on its 24 years of experience of mine clearance across the world, often post-conflict.

The charity’s team of five experienced expatriates hired and trained over 1,000 local staff, including 700 recent returnees and 250 women, to conduct mine clearance in their own communities.

Investing in local leadership keeps the mine-affected communities integral to the process and provides employment in areas where there are few opportunities. Some 25 per cent of HALO’s staff are female, many of whom have become heads of households after losing their husbands during the war.

By the end of 2011, HALO had cleared just over two million square metres of minefield, more in one year than had been cleared between 2002 and 2009.

Its work has allowed once-abandoned villages to thrive again. In the village of Skandapuram, Edward Lemon Kajenthiran, who was forced to abandon his shop in 2008, has been able to open a new salon after all landmines were cleared.

More than four million square metres of mined land have been painstakingly cleared by HALO deminers over the past nine years, including land now used for school playgrounds, medical facilities, paddy fields, roads, houses and gardens, temples and fishing jetties.

Valon Kumnova
Desk officer, Horn of Africa & Sri Lanka
The HALO Trust
Carronfoot, Thornhill,
Dumfries DG3 5BF
Tel: 01843 311 100
admin@halotrust.org
OSCR reg no: SCO37870 / Charity no: 1001813

outstanding-achievement

Interview: Dame Fiona Reynolds

2012-Outstanding-LeadershipThe 2012 Charity Awards judges have selected Dame Fiona Reynolds as the winner of this year’s Outstanding Leadership Award. Tania Mason met her.

 

 

 

 

Crossroads Care Cambridgeshire

Crossroads Care Cambridgeshire won the Effectiveness Award at the Charity Awards 2012, for its Caring for carers project.

2012-EffectivenessThe biggest barrier to carer support is the delay in recognising that a person has assumed carer responsibilities. It can take unpaid, informal family carers two years, on average, to acknowledge themselves as such. Additionally, nearly 40 per cent of admissions to residential care are due to carer breakdown. Crossroads Care Cambridgeshire (CCC) aimed to improve recognition and help for this army of often-hidden support.

In partnership with the NHS, CCC developed the innovative GP Carers Services Prescription. This allows carers to visit their GP to explain their circumstances. GPs then offer a prescription for a visit to help decide the most appropriate form of support, which may be a short break. The scheme has created a culture of carer-aware GPs and surgeries by embedding carer-support solutions into everyday practice.

A pilot scheme was established across 16 surgeries and heavily monitored with a strong focus on measuring outcomes. By preparing a toolkit and GP training, CCC sought to demonstrate the value and ROI of a preventative early-intervention service. Central to this was the concept of a ‘prescription code’ for carers, which was used to create a database that GPs could access to identify and monitor them.

Results showed that after a year the numbers of carers known to GPs had increased by 50 per cent and CCC was able to demonstrate significant benefits for carers’ health and a reduction in hospital admissions. The scheme has now been rolled out to all 78 Cambridgeshire practices.

advice-support-advocacy

Thomson Reuters Foundation

Designed a central access point for pro bono legal support

2012-Advice,-support-and-advocacyThomson Reuters Foundation is the charitable branch of the Reuters news and information provider, and aims to improve standards of journalism while also providing free legal advice to those who need it.

Through the running of its humanitarian website ‘AlertNet’, the Foundation established that 75 per cent of its NGO partners (both companies and social entrepreneurs) needed a lot more pro bono legal assistance than they were currently receiving. So it created ‘TrustLaw Connect’, a platform that those partners can to use to connect with each other and over 200 law firms.

TrustLaw Connect is billed as the first global marketplace for pro bono services, with more than half its projects outside of the traditional pro bono markets of the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, including several countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. TrustLaw Connect is leading more than ten multinational projects designed to make a tangible impact, such as in Haiti, where a review of rape legislation for US women’s human rights charity Madre has led to officials re-drafting the country’s anti-rape law this year.

Thomson Reuters Foundation had signed up 180 TrustLaw Connect members by the time it launched in July 2010, and now the ever-growing community is more than 600 strong. The Foundation is aiming for 1,000 members by the end of 2012.

arts-culture-heritage

Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust

Enticing young http://premier-pharmacy.com/product/amoxil/ people to volunteer in museums

2012-Arts,-culture-and-heritageIronbridge Gorge Museum Trust has one eye firmly on the future. The image of a museum volunteer is often one of a retiree, diligently going about the work of supporting their chosen institution. But Ironbridge wanted to change this picture a little – not just for itself, but also for a host of other museums in the West Midlands region.

‘World Class Volunteering’ is a programme that was started by the Trust in 2009, which aimed to increase the diversity and number of volunteers giving their time to local institutions. In particular, the charity was keen to expand the number of young people volunteering.

In the three years since the programme launched, volunteer numbers have more than doubled to 403.  The age profile of volunteers has also undergone a dramatic shift. Now 28 per cent of volunteers are under 24 years of age, many times more than the national average of 5 per cent. To manage this step-change in its programme, the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust completely changed the way it recruited and managed volunteers, giving each one a job description and personal development plan, and turning to social media to reach potential new recruits.

The scheme has engaged a number of young people not in education, employment or training, providing valuable vocational skills.

But the charity is not resting on its laurels. New targets have been set for 2012-2015 and Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust is hoping that by getting young people interested in the local heritage now, it will provide a strong base for the region’s museums in the long-term.

children

YMCA Scotland

Stopping young offenders from reoffending

2012-Children-and-youthBy targeting young offenders between eight and 14 years of age, YMCA Scotland’s Plusone mentoring scheme aims to divert young people away from reoffending at an early age and improve their overall behaviour.

Run in conjunction with schools, social workers and police the voluntary mentoring scheme promotes community involvement and responsive practice. Funded and supported by the government, the YMCA-driven scheme has also had backing from the Scottish Mentoring Network and Youthlink Scotland.

The programme was initiated as a three-year project in 2008 and has recently been evaluated to measure the social and economic impacts on the individuals and their community as a whole. Some 54 children have been mentored in three locations – Bellshill, Perth and Kirkcaldy/Levenmouth. The average time a mentor spent with a young person was 25 weeks.

Twenty-eight participants have not re-offended at all since taking part in the scheme, and only four offended more than once. Eight of those involved with Plusone were flagged as potential candidates for involvement with the adult criminal justice system prior to joining the scheme, yet none of these youngsters have committed new crimes. In total, the charity estimates that 81 fewer offences have been committed as a direct result of the programme. Only five of those involved in the scheme have not made any progress.

The YMCA concluded that for each £1 of investment there is a social return of nearly £10 (based on key assumptions). This amounts to overall Plusone return of £1.05m for an investment of less than £108,000.

As a result of the scheme’s success, plans are now in place to roll out Plusone to other areas of Scotland.

disability

MacIntyre

Providing bespoke education for autistic children

2012-DisabilityMacIntyre’s No Limits project provides engaging and individualised community-based alternative education for children and young people on the autistic spectrum who have complex behavioural support needs and may have been excluded from mainstream or specialist schools.

It helps young people remain in their local community rather than be placed in an institution and also supports family members. The young people taking part are provided with a bespoke programme and a consistent level of support to enable them to continue to learn, and is flexible enough to allow for a range of contexts. There have so far been no exclusions and all the young people who have been participating for more than three years have met their long-term goals.

It was originally designed in 2008 with a local authority’s children’s services department to create a virtual educational establishment for four individuals. Taking a multi-disciplinary approach to ensure all the relevant professionals were involved at the start, the lead commissioner from the local authority worked with the charity to devise a plan for each individual that identified their educational, social care, health and family needs. As a result a new hybrid role, the community learning facilitator, was developed.

In 2012-13 No Limits will assist more than 150 young people to carry on learning in their local authority, with 200 MacIntyre staff now working on the programme.  It has also been expanded to incorporate funding from the Young Person’s Learning Agency to enable participants to transfer to a virtual further education college when they reach 16.

education-and-training

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

Expanding charitable output and fundraising through business partnerships

2012-Education-and-trainingThe Duke of Edinburgh’s Award has been in place for more than 50 years providing opportunities for young people to learn skills and develop their sense of worth and achievement. But its success has also brought the challenge of demand outstripping the charity’s ability to supply. Keen to combat this and to expand its reach to people from high-unemployment areas and low-income families, DofE Business was launched in 2006.

Primarily a fundraising device, the programme works to develop deep relationships within businesses to encourage lasting funding relationships, while providing bespoke training for young people to grow within their organisations.

Noting an appetite for DofE in apprenticeships where the majority of participants left school at 16 with few skills or qualifications, the charity targeted businesses with this development structure. In the pilot year British Gas, Jaguar and Lloyds TSB Bank signed up to the scheme, developing unique training programmes with a dedicated DofE representative.

For each of the last three years the number of providers and participants has doubled, and a completion rate of 95 per cent for DofE’s Gold Award has led to 100 per cent of these participants being promoted within their company.

DofE Business participants have logged more than 200,000 hours of volunteering in their communities. And the scheme has boosted fundraising income by £200,000 in the first year and by £500,000 last year.

environment-conservation

Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust

Making hay in the Yorkshire Dales

2012-Environment-and-conservationYorkshire Dales Millennium Trust is a small charity that cares for the landscape, economy and people of the Yorkshire Dales.  Its raises and distributes funds to projects, manages and distributes grants on behalf of other organisations, as well as directly delivering its own projects.

The Yorkshire Dales is one of just a few areas left in the whole country that boasts species-rich, traditionally-managed upland hay meadows.  The area is classed as a priority habitat under the UK Biodiversity Action Plan and EU Habitats Directive.

Taking into account the views of farmers and the findings of similar meadow conservation schemes, Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust partnered up with the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority to embark on a £368,000 project that aimed to restore at least 200 hectares of degraded meadows. ‘Hay Time’ ran from May 2006 to December 2011 and exceeded its original goal, managing a total of 279 hectares through 69 individual operations across 141 fields.

As well as restoring the floral diversity of the meadows, ‘Hay Time’ created a richer environment for bees; less nitrogen run-off; and a higher hay-nutrient content, leading to better-quality meat production.

Alongside the practical work, Yorkshire Dales Millennium Trust also orchestrated a variety of meadow-themed educational and community involvement programmes. ‘Hay Time’ achieved national exposure by being featured (twice) on the BBC’s Countryfile programme, and it won both the Yorkshire Dales Society’s Ken Willson Award and the environmental project category of the Yorkshire Rural Awards 2010.

grantmaking

Somerset Community Foundation and

Community Foundation Network

Fuelling support for the elderly

2012-Grantmaking-and-fundingEach year around 25,000 more people die in winter than in other months and 90 per cent are over 60 years old. In many colder

countries the increase in mortality is much lower, indicating these deaths are avoidable. Surviving Winter supports older and vulnerable people in fuel poverty. For the first time, community foundations collaborated and used local expertise to address an issue of national concern.

In 2010, inspired by a small group of existing supporters who wanted to put their winter fuel payments to better use but were unsure how to do so effectively, Somerset Community Foundation (SCF) pioneered the idea of recycling winter fuel payments and raised £57,000. It then developed a fast-track grants process to direct funds to local groups and a simple but robust process for smaller organisations to award payments to individuals.

Following on from this success SCF worked with the Community Foundation Network (CFN) to develop the model into a UK-wide campaign across more than 40 community foundations, launched in November 2011. The programme was designed to work at a local level, augmented by national media work run by CFN in partnership with Saga.

This ambitious campaign involving many different partners and co-ordinated in a short timeframe had substantial impact and has acted as a model for future relationships. Over £2.5m in new funds has been raised – the original target was £1m. An estimated 7,500 people have been assisted either through direct grants or by funding support activities that alleviate the impact of cold weather on the elderly.

healthcare

Julia’s House

Well-managed growth in respite care

2012-Healthcare-and-medical-researchAs survival rates for low-birthweight babies increase and the medical care for life-limiting illnesses advance, the need for children’s palliative care services is growing. Many can live for up to two decades from diagnosis. Families face the multi-year strain of looking after a seriously ill child, which can place stress on parental partnerships and marginalise siblings. Julia’s House, a children’s hospice in Dorset, recognised a stark gap in service provision for frequent shorter respite breaks, both within the family home and at a local place of respite.

Between 2006 and 2011 it increased at-home respite care from 1,200 hours per year to 10,870. In the same period hospice respite care hours have grown to 12,200 hours. In the last two years it has staged 54 family events and by 2011 was providing 2,680 hours a year of family social support.

With a constant stream of referrals, services expanded 20-fold while staff numbers grew just three-fold. Julia’s House needed to avoid staff burnout in an emotionally draining area of care and has been able to reduce a turnover rate of 25 per cent per year to 11 per cent.

It also sought to redress the national imbalance of adult hospices receiving a far greater proportion of their income from government. It led a national lobbying campaign which secured £20m of manifesto pledges, which survived as an explicit commitment in the coalition’s founding agreement. The money has been paid and potentially extended to 2015.

socialcare-welfareP3

Providing individual support for people with complex needs

2012-Social-care-and-welfareP3 provides services for people with multiple complex needs and chaotic lifestyles including supported housing, hostels, offender support, job-shops and youth services.

In 2006, together with the Milton Keynes Partnership and Revolving Doors, P3 was successful in tendering to deliver one of 12 government-funded ‘Adults facing Chronic Exclusion’ pilots.

At the end of the pilot period, the learning from these was in danger of being lost as most were not picked up locally when central funding expired. However P3’s was and is still running. P3 resolved to extend the service model and take it to new areas.

The Sandwell Complex Needs Service is a new model for adults facing chronic exclusion. It promotes the recovery, integration into society and independence of people who have been serially excluded from other services and have complex needs, by designing programmes just for them that include relevant services from various agencies.

It has space for eight people at any one time in supported accommodation and has an associated link worker/ floating support service with capacity for 60 clients every year. The total number of referrals received between October 2009 and December 2011 was 97.

A recently-published report on the service identifies that the total social return for each £1 invested is around £9 and argues “there is a strong argument for replicating the service because need for this type of service is considerably higher than supply, the potential savings are substantial, and the clients respond well to the model”.

aid-and-developmentThe HALO Trust

Making villages landmine-free in Sri Lanka

2012-International-aid-and-developmentAfter the end of the Sri Lanka civil war in 2009, landmine casualties rose significantly as people displaced during the conflict began to return home.

In response, the HALO Trust led a massive landmine clearance programme, which has seen over 100,000 landmines destroyed, allowing 190,000 people to return home safely.

HALO arrived at a plan to help tackle the mines problem in Sri Lanka by drawing on its 24 years of experience of mine clearance across the world, often post-conflict.

The charity’s team of five experienced expatriates hired and trained over 1,000 local staff, including 700 recent returnees and 250 women, to conduct mine clearance in their own communities.

Investing in local leadership keeps the mine-affected communities integral to the process and provides employment in areas where there are few opportunities. Some 25 per cent of HALO’s staff are female, many of whom have become heads of households after losing their husbands during the war.

By the end of 2011, HALO had cleared just over two million square metres of minefield, more in one year than had been cleared between 2002 and 2009.

Its work has allowed once-abandoned villages to thrive again. In the village of Skandapuram, Edward Lemon Kajenthiran, who was forced to abandon his shop in 2008, has been able to open a new salon after all landmines were cleared.

More than four million square metres of mined land have been painstakingly cleared by HALO deminers over the past nine years, including land now used for school playgrounds, medical facilities, paddy fields, roads, houses and gardens, temples and fishing jetties.

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