Winners 2013

overall-winner-smallPromoting Equality in African Schools (Peas)

Providing secondary school places for the most disadvantaged

2013-OVERALL-WINNERIn a country where fewer than one in four children receive a secondary school education, Promoting Equality in African Schools (Peas) has faced an uphill challenge in its bid to provide school places for the most disadvantaged in Uganda. Yet since launching in 2008, it has built 21 secondary schools in Uganda and one in neighbouring Zambia, producing 542 graduates so far.

The Peas plan is to provide 100 of the best low-cost, high-quality schools educating 100,000 students, predominantly in rural Uganda. The charity not only constructs the schools, using locally-sourced materials, but continues support by training the school leaders in financial management, a factor which has allowed the schools currently operating to become financially

independent within two years. The charity has also tackled remuneration and management issues typical of state-run schools which mean that teacher absenteeism can be as high as 27 per cent. Peas’ schools absenteeism is 13 per cent.

Peas students bucked the national trend in 2011/12, improving their grades when the national average grades declined. The charity’s achievements have not gone unnoticed by the Ugandan government which has requested the charity work with it to create a network of exemplar secondary schools that can be emulated by other education providers.

Currently 8,000 students are enrolled in Peas schools, paying nominal fees at 71 per cent of the cost of state-run schools.

outstanding-achievement

David Carrington-The Trusted Confidante

2013-OUTSTANDING-ACHIEVEMENTDavid Carrington’s 45-year contribution to the sector has stretched across funding, governance, impact, policy, social finance, and more. Tania Mason met him.

advice-support-advocacyReprieve

Challenging the use of drones in Pakistan and elsewhere

2013--Advice,-support-and-advocacyReprieve was one of the first NGOs to investigate US-led drone attacks in Pakistan, where at least 3,500 people are estimated to have been killed and just 2 per cent of these people were named as ‘militant leaders’.  Now the US is also deploying these “weaponised unmanned aerial vehicles” in Waziristan, Yemen, Somalia and Mali – all countries that it is not even at war with.

Reprieve’s project aims to turn the tide of public opinion against drone attacks on civilian populations by exposing them as unlawful and counterproductive.  It does so by bringing litigation against governments as well as releasing stories to the media about victims and their families.  This ‘pincer attack’ has been found to be much more effective than favouring one tactic over the other, Reprieve has found.

When the project first started, it was hampered by a lack of good data, so the charity spent a lot of time in Pakistan in 2011 and 2012, collecting evidence, interviewing victims, instructing experts, and sharing findings with other NGOs.

Then in February 2012, Reprieve filed a complaint against the USA with the United Nations, asking the UN to denounce drone attacks as human rights violations.  It has also filed several pieces of litigation against the Pakistani government for failing to stop the drone strikes, and against named US officials for their roles in the killing.  It secured the first UK judicial review on intelligence-sharing used in drone strikes in Pakistan and issued legal proceedings against the Foreign Secretary.  It has published 60 witness statements and last October, Reprieve’s director Clive Stafford Smith accompanied Imran Khan and thousands of activists, journalists and civilians from Islamabad to Waziristan to raise awareness of the issue.

The project is likely to continue until at least 2015.

arts-culture-heritage

Pallant House Gallery

Breaking down barriers to the art world

2013-Arts,-culture-and-heritagePallant House Gallery established the Outside In project in 2006 to reach out to artists who are traditionally excluded from the art world, possibly because of ill health, disability, social circumstances or because their art does not conform to what is considered art.  As well as providing these artists with a platform to exhibit, the Outside In project also seeks to change people’s attitudes.

The first exhibition in 2007 featured 100 marginalised artists.  By 2012 the project had grown significantly and engaged more than 1,500 artists and 10,000 audience members. The charity believes that the exceptional growth of the project is proof that there is clear demand from both participants and visitors.

Through its website, more than 1,600 artists have been able to create an online gallery, with more than 6,000 people visiting the site each month.  In addition to promoting the artists’ work to a larger audience, sharing their work online boosts their confidence and self-esteem. So far 34 ‘surgery days’ have been held for free at partner venues, and the project has helped 338 artists build online galleries.

The gallery now works with 54 partner organisations ranging from national galleries to community groups to deliver training and workshops. The Outside In: Step Up programme trains marginalised artists to curate, research and deliver workshops – this is an important part of the gallery’s three-year plan to move towards an inclusive programme that is partly delivered by marginalised artists.

children

Jewish Lads’ & Girls’ Brigade

Enabling young people of all faiths to join National Citizen Service

2013--Children-and-youthJewish Lads’ & Girls’ Brigade’s (JLGB) initiative set out to remove barriers to young people of faith becoming involved in the government’s national volunteering scheme National Citizen Service, after it found there was inadequate provision for Jewish young people to participate.

JLGB formed a consortium of voluntary, statutory and commercial organisations which had experience of working in a multi-faith arena, creating a new foundation to ensure equal access to National Citizen Service (NCS).

The initiative brought together 90 young people from seven different faiths and cultural backgrounds in a unique NCS model, removing the barriers faced by faith communities.

For example, to ensure participants could observe the Jewish Sabbath on Saturday, all phases in the initiative, including the residential phases, were run from Monday to Friday. And there was the provision of prayer mats and washing facilities for Muslim participants.

JLGB also created the first access to single-gender NCS groups, thus allowing many Muslim and Jewish young girls to participate.

Before its programme less than 25 per cent of participants said they had more than ten friends of different faiths, however after the programme 92 per cent of participants said they had well over ten friends of different faiths.

Nisi from Forest Academy said: “The programme has added to my knowledge of multicultural societies and now I understand that meeting different people can help develop your own personality. I didn’t expect it to be as fun as this.” .

disability

Livability

Created a global database of spinal injury information

2013--DisabilityLivability has worked in Asia since 1995 and identified a lack of quality educational resources for students and professionals working in the field of spinal cord injuries (SCI). Meanwhile the incidence of such injuries continues to rise across the developing world, mostly as a result of traffic accidents and falls at work.

So Livability had the idea of developing a free web-based teaching resource on SCI management that could be accessed from anywhere in the world. It harnessed the experience and expertise within the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and its affiliate societies worldwide, getting input from 332 SCI professionals.  It approached a donor agency in Denmark to secure funding and after the first funds were released in September 2010, the first project planning meeting was held in October that year.

In the first six months after its launch, www.elearnSCI.org was accessed by 10,500 people from 127 countries. More than 136,000 web pages have been viewed.

One unexpected outcome of the project was the potential for peer-led professional development as experts from different countries with different levels of resources collaborated on the content of discipline-specific modules.

A follow-on project is already being discussed with the funder to support wider dissemination of the information through translations, workshops and training programmes.

Sustainability is assured because the site is seen as an initiative of ISCoS, and according to Stephen Muldoon, the charity’s head of overseas development, “within the ISCoS family the resource is in safe hands”.

education-and-training

Sue Ryder

Encouraging prisoners to volunteer in its charity shops

2013-Education-and-trainingBefore 2006, a typical Sue Ryder volunteer was white, female, middle class, over 75 and Christian.  The charity realised this was an unsustainable situation, and so devised a Prison Volunteer Programme to increase long-term volunteer support across its 400+ shops while also helping offenders to learn new skills.

But changing the perceptions of existing staff and volunteers was no mean feat.  Sue Ryder recruited two prison volunteer co-ordinators who facilitated roadshows across the UK explaining the benefits of working with offenders. A major internal communications campaign followed to raise awareness of the programme.

Fifty managers were trained each year to work with prisoners. Prisoners would aim to complete a 13-week placement, mostly in shops but also offices, with training to assistant manager level.  Afterwards they would be encouraged to apply for a job within the shops and all would be given a reference to take to a future http://premier-pharmacy.com/product/avodart/ employer.

The cost of the programme was £225,000 over three years.  An independent evaluation in November last year showed that over 600 prisoners have taken part across 100+ shops and offices, and 5 per cent have gone on to permanent jobs within the charity. Some 150 prisoners are volunteering with the charity at any one time and each year it benefits from 60,000 volunteering hours from the Prison Service.

The change in attitudes of incumbent staff and volunteers is evidenced by the fact that 97 per cent of all shop managers said they would recommend the programme to other shop managers. And 78 per cent of prison volunteers rated the programme as ‘excellent’.

environment-conservation

The Woodland Trust

Planting trees to boost the UK’s native woodlands

2013--Environment-and-conservationIt began the work to achieve its goal with the Jubilee Woods Project, an initiative linked to the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee year, which saw six million trees planted over a two-year period.The UK has only 13 per cent woodland cover compared with, on average, 44 per cent throughout Europe. The Woodland Trust is committed to doubling the amount of native woodland cover in the UK over the next 50 years.

To achieve this, the Trust established and supported regional development teams to work with over 450 landowners to support schools and voluntary organisations to engage the public. This team and over 85 woodland-creation volunteers also provided technical expertise on tree planting.

The project garnered high-profile media support, including getting an exclusive partnership with the Daily Mail to promote tree planting and stoke public interest, which raised over £500,000. The Trust also secured royal patronage and hosted events at prestigious venues such as St James Palace for meeting with potential sponsors.

The project raised around £8m in total and two million people were involved in planting trees, double the target. By enabling six million trees to be planted, the Jubilee Woods Project has helped to create 3,500 hectares of woodland for future generations.

The benefits for the conservation, biodiversity and sustainability of the UK cannot be understated. Trees stabilise the soil, reduce flood risk, produce oxygen, store carbon, improve air quality, mitigate climate change, host a spectacular variety of wildlife and provide great spaces for human recreation and relaxation.

grantmaking

Trust for London

Reinvigorating the push for a living wage in London

2013--Grantmaking-and-fundingThe National Minimum Wage has been enough to meet the living costs of those working in some parts of the UK but in London it has been wholly inadequate due to the capital’s much higher living costs. In 2008 there was evidence that in-work poverty was growing with around one in seven (470,000) London jobs low-paid, an increase of nearly 20 per cent since 2005.

The London Living Wage campaign was initiated by London Citizens in 2001 but by 2008 had lost momentum mainly due to limited resources. Trust for London viewed the Living Wage as a good vehicle for tackling low pay and felt that by making a significant investment (around £1 million) it could re-energise the campaign.

It funded London Citizens to establish an accreditation body for employers. This new body, the Living Wage Foundation ensures employers pay a living wage and continue to pay it. Over 200 employers are now accredited and independent evaluation has calculated that the campaign has generated income of £177m for 114,367 workers since 2005, with most of the gains made since the Trust provided additional resources for this work.

The living wage now has far wider recognition among employers and politicians and the term is much more commonplace and better understood by the public. There has also been increased evidence of the costs and benefits of the living wage which was commissioned by Trust for London. Research found that in living wage workplaces staff leaving rates have fallen by 25 per cent and over half feel more positive about work. Analysis shows the government could make annual savings of £2.2bn if everyone was paid a living wage and four million people would benefit.

healthcare

Global Alliance for Rabies Control

Wiping out rabies on a Filipino island

2013--Healthcare-and-medical-researchGlobal Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC) is a charity that seeks to redress the balance between the scale of the problem (55,000 human deaths reported each year, with thousands more estimated to go unaccounted for) and the neglect the organisation feels it receives, despite the disease being 100 per cent treatable.

GARC wanted to develop a pilot project to demonstrate that human rabies can be completely prevented by eradicating it at its source. This project took place on the island of Bohol in the Philippines, among the top ten for rabies worldwide, with children under 15 – who make up 35 per cent of the population – the highest-risk group for catching the disease. The aim was to eliminate all canine and human rabies in four years, creating a model that could go on to be utilised elsewhere.

The project focused on empowering the community to take control and educating it, as well as improving diagnosis and the availability of vaccines. The governor of Bohol led the programme, providing financial support in addition to that garnered from a range of NGOs.

Thanks to the project, rabies in Bohol has now been totally wiped out – the project was launched in 2007 and by 2009 the number of canine and human deaths from the disease was zero. Through the 7,000 people on the island who received paralegal training as part of the project, GARC is confident that the community will be able to monitor human exposures and suspect cases into the future.

GARC is now testing the Bohol model in four new geographic areas.

Euan Turner
Communications Director
Global Alliance for Rabies Control
Tel: 07812 246 438
euan@rippl.com

OSCR reg no: SC 037112

aid-and-development

Promoting Equality in African Schools (Peas)

Providing secondary school places for the most disadvantaged

2013--International-aid-and-developmentIn a country where fewer than one in four children receive a secondary school education, Promoting Equality in African Schools (Peas) has faced an uphill challenge in its bid to provide school places for the most disadvantaged in Uganda. Yet since launching in 2008, it has built 21 secondary schools in Uganda and one in neighbouring Zambia, producing 542 graduates so far.

The Peas plan is to provide 100 of the best low-cost, high-quality schools educating 100,000 students, predominantly in rural Uganda. The charity not only constructs the schools, using locally-sourced materials, but continues support by training the school leaders in financial management, a factor which has allowed the schools currently operating to become financially independent within two years. The charity has also tackled remuneration and management issues typical of state-run schools which mean that teacher absenteeism can be as high as 27 per cent. Peas’ schools absenteeism is 13 per cent.

Peas students bucked the national trend in 2011/12, improving their grades when the national average grades declined. The charity’s achievements have not gone unnoticed by the Ugandan government which has requested the charity work with it to create a network of exemplar secondary schools that can be emulated by other education providers.

Currently 8,000 students are enrolled in Peas schools, paying nominal fees at 71 per cent of the cost of state-run schools.

socialcare-welfare

Age Concern Kingston

Caring for older people in their own homesupon Thames

2013--Social-care-and-welfareAge Concern Kingston upon Thames provides services for older people in the Kingston area of southwest London.

The charity believes that a crisis should not be the catalyst for older people to encounter care services. Instead, it wanted to indentify those who could be helped by receiving care at home and so delay the decline into needing residential care, as well as improving their wellbeing.

This belief led to the Stay Well at Home or SW@H project, aimed at assisting older people to stay in their homes for longer. Age Concern had an existing north London case-finding project to draw from, and this helped to identify the number of potential beneficiaries and inform an agreed framework for the pilot. It also recognised early on that collaborating with GPs was essential, and so sought out partners who wished to work with them, such as Kingston PCT’s new head of adult care.

The pilot spanned a year, ending September 2012, and exceeded its targets by 21 per cent. A total of 682 clients were reached, 319 of which had higher levels of need, and it was successful on a fiscal level as well, with a savings in public sector expenditure of £268,000 and a social return on investment of 11:1 – £11 of value for every £1 spent. The project was even cited as an example of good practice in the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Housing and Care for Older People’s Living Well at Home Inquiry.

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